1580 Liverpool Court Unit 7 Ottawa,(613) 260-8262 (TBMA)

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BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu has been around for many many years and is derived from the art of self-defense out of Japan that samurai originally were practicing as a form of defense against open hand or weapons.

Jiu-Jitsu can be softly translated as soft or gentle art, in which case the meaning is simply using technique against a larger opponent.

This art has been in practice since the days of Samurai and has become a staple in the art of self-defense where it is seen not only in “Martial Arts” venues or situations. Examples can vary from Martial Arts studios to Military and Police practice.

Many Martial Arts forms derive from Jiu-Jitsu such as Kuk Sul Won, Kenjukembo, Judo, Karate, Aikido, Hapkido, and many many more.

Brazilian jiu-jitsu eventually came to be its own art through the experimentation, practices, and adaptation from the Judo knowledge of Carlos and Hélio Gracie, who then passed their knowledge on to their extended family.

Today Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is known all over the globe and is a main art practiced for professional MMA fighters.

Here we use Robert Drysdale’s BJJ as a choice because of his knowledge and World Championship status as well as being a great human being! We travel to Las Vegas twice a year to train with this World Champion as he is our leader and hope to raise champions as good as he done for the rest his team.

Muay Thai / Kickboxing

The art of Muay Thai kickboxing is one of many striking sports. We have chosen to use Muay Thai as it has the best technique proven throughout centuries on how to beat an opponent in a stand up war. It is of course a warrior’s art that was used in times of battle and then eventually became a way of life for fitness needs and the need for a competitive sport!

Using the art of Muay Thai considers 8 limbs rather then 4. Using elbows and knees as extra limbs gives an advantage and also maximum health benefits in working your heart and lungs

Mixed Martial Arts

During the Greco-Roman era there existed an ancient Olympic combat sport, known as Pankration which featured a combination of grappling and striking skills, similar to modern Mixed Martial Arts. This sport originated in Ancient Greece and was later passed on to the Romans.[5]No-holds-barred fighting reportedly took place in the late 1880s when wrestlers representing a huge range of fighting styles, including various catch wrestling styles, Greco-Roman wrestling and many others met in tournaments and music-hall challenge matches throughout Europe. In the USA the first major encounter between a boxer and a wrestler in modern times took place in 1887 when John L. Sullivan, then heavyweight world boxing champion, entered the ring with his trainer, Greco-Roman wrestling champion William Muldoon, and was slammed to the mat in two minutes. The next publicized encounter occurred in the late 1890s when future heavyweight boxing champion Bob Fitzsimmons took on European Greco-Roman wrestling champion Ernest Roeber.

Junior Samurai Jiu-Jitsu

Jiu-Jitsu itself was developed in Japan during the Feudal period. It was originally an art designed for warfare, but after the abolition of the Feudal system in Japan, certain modifications needed to be made to the art in order to make it suitable for practice. During Feudal times, Jiu-Jitsu was also known as Yawara, Hakuda, Kogusoko, and an assortment of other names. The earliest recorded use of the word “jiu-jitsu” happens in 1532 and is coined by the Takenouchi Ryu (school). The history of the art during this time is uncertain because teachers kept everything secret to give their art a feeling of importance and then would change the stories of their art to suit their own needs.

After the Feudal period in Japan ended (Jiu-jitsu was no longer needed on the battlefield), a way to practice the art realistically was needed, which is why Jigoro Kano (1860–1938), a practitioner of Jiu-Jitsu, developed his own system of Jiu-Jitsu in the late 1800′s, called Judo. Judo was helpful because it allowed practitioners the ability to try the art safely and realistically at the same time. The most important contribution Judo made to the practice of “Jiu-jitsu” was the concept of Rondori. Rondori was a form of sparing and contained a set of sportive rules that made practice safe, yet realistic. Because of the sportive outlet (rules that made practice safe), students of Jiu-jitsu from Kano’s school were able to practice more frequently due to the fact that they were not always recovering from injuries. This multiplies the amount of training time for student’s of Kano’s school and drastically increased their abilities. Judo (Kano’s version of Jiu-jitsu) was watered down from the complete form (of Jiu-jitsu), but still contained enough techniques to preserve its realistic effectiveness. The one problem that occurred was, in Kano’s opinion, ground work was not as important as achieving the throw or take down, therefore ground fighting was not emphasized in Judo and became weak in that system. Judo also began placing too many rules and regulations on the art to make it more acceptable as an Olympic sport. Leg locks were not allowed, and when a fight went to the ground, a player had only 25 seconds to escape a hold or pin before the match was lost. These are a few of the rules that hindered Judo as a realistic form of self-defense. Then why did Judo flourish and why was it so great? Even with all the rules and restrictions, the time-tested principle of “pure grappler beats pure striker,” still holds true. The fact remains that most fights, even those fights occurring between strikers with no grappling experience, end up in a clinch. You see the clinch in just about every boxing match, and hundreds of punches usually need to be thrown to end the fight with a strike, which gives the grappler plenty of opportunity to take his/her opponent to the ground, where a pure striker has no experience and is at the grappler’s mercy.

LATEST NEWS
September 21st, 2017

Robert Drysdale-Zenith BJJ

September 21st, 2017

Muay Thai Ontario

August 7th, 2017

BACK TO SCHOOL! EXTENDED!

June 29th, 2017

Don’t PASS THIS UP!

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Team Bushido MMA and Fitness

1580 Liverpool Court Unit 7, Ottawa  K1B4L2

613-260-8262 (TBMA)

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Team Bushido MMA Fitness Center

Ottawa, Ontario,
Phone: (613)260-8262
info@teambushido.com

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